Archive for December, 2017


KoH: 10 Virgins (part three)

(For the full essay, go here. If you missed Part One, or Part Two, there you go.)

“And while they went to buy, the bridegroom came; and they that were ready went in with him to the marriage: and the door was shut.”-Matthew 25:10.

In Jewish custom, the Rabbi performed the marriage ceremony at the bride’s parents’ house. Once the groom arrived, they shut the door. If you weren’t ready, you missed the ceremony. Afterwards, with their torches lit, the virgins danced down the street, leading the marriage procession to the groom’s parents’ house.

Unlike us, the Jewish couple in ancient times didn’t go away on a honeymoon. Instead, at the groom’s parents’ house, they held a week-long celebration. Anyone could come. The doors remained open. People came and went, whether they were wise or foolish, and participated in the most glorious party, celebrating the marriage between love and life.

We are reborn, and begin the path to wisdom by being mindful of what we and others need: Do they need to be forgiven? Forgive them. Do they need compassion? Be compassionate unto them. By practicing in this way, we learn to respect and admire everyone and everything. We practice love until we feel it, without having to stop and think.

We understand that no one is always wise. So we forgive them when they’re foolish. We realize that no one is always a fool, so we admire them when they show wisdom. As we watch them, we’re aware of ourselves wavering: good, bad, wise, foolish.

Being born again means that we choose to become aware of this vacillation, in ourselves and others. And we commit ourselves to wisdom. Then, we become lambs.

Part of wisdom is knowing that, just as we needed time to prepare, other people haven’t learned from experience; they haven’t dedicated themselves to a better life. They are wolves.

Don’t expect a wolf to be a lamb. And, as a lamb, be wary of slipping back into the pack, howling with them as they hunt their neighbors. Just know, more than likely (actually, without a doubt), you will slip. So have patience with them, as you do with yourself; forgive them, and yourself. Have mercy, because the time will come when, during such a slip, you will need mercy.

The door shuts, regardless of whether you’re inside or out.

“Afterward came also the other [foolish] virgins, saying, Lord, Lord, open to us.”-Matthew 25:11.

Keep in mind, when Jesus told this parable, he was aware that his Jewish audience knew the custom; they knew of the week-long party, which anyone could attend. But they also knew, if you were outside the shut door, you would miss the ceremony.

There is always another test. But there’s also a potential for finality. In the flesh, I will never get to tell my Grandfather that he was right, that everything I searched for was in the Bible. That door closed. But I can pass it on. I cannot pay him back, but I can pay it forward. That’s what these essays are: What I would say to him, if I could, if I had been ready to enter the door, and attend the ceremony with him.

But I was a small fish (and still am). So the fishermen threw me back. I was a tare, so the farmers separated me from the wheat. Without that heartbreaking, and illuminating experience, I would not be on this journey today. And these essays would not exist.

“Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven.”-Matthew 7:21.

God’s will for the world is whatever happens. The Lord’s will for us is that we love whatever happens. Even, or especially, if we don’t understand, or approve, or agree, we love because Jesus loves us, because God loves the world, all life, everything: good, evil, wise, foolish, the caterpillar under the log in the middle of the jungle, the murderer on death row: God has enough love for all of it, all of us. That’s why we’re here. This is wisdom.

But if we choose to not love, if we’re unable to understand the necessity for automatic forgiveness, then Jesus shuts the door. We cannot enter, what we’re unwilling to enter. We cannot pass the line we’ve drawn. So we judge and condemn ourselves.

“But he answered [the foolish virgins] and said, Verily I say unto you, I know you not.”-Matthew 25:12.

By failing to prepare, we disrespect the groom, his bride, the other guests, and ourselves. If you remember, from Revelation, the bride is everyone. Plus, the 10 virgins represent everyone. And Jesus is the groom.

So, by failing to prepare, we haven’t shown reverence to God, which is everyone and everything. Solomon taught that reverence to all is the beginning of wisdom. Without wisdom, we are foolish.

When Jesus says he doesn’t know us, it’s because we don’t know love. Wisdom is the understanding that comes from sharing love. Without that awareness, we cannot be born again, and enter the kingdom of heaven.

“Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me.”-Revelation 3:20.

It might seem to us that Jesus is keeping us out, when, really, we deny him entrance. He didn’t leave us at the altar; we left him. God didn’t abandon the earth; we abandoned him. See the pattern?

Saying “Lord, Lord” means nothing, if we refuse to forgive, and show mercy and compassion.

“And why call ye me Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say?”-Luke 6:46.

Like the Sower, when we love others, we plant a seed, which needs time to grow. During that time we learn patience: We wait on the Lord. And we learn wisdom: We watch God’s will work itself out, through the apocalypse, and into the marriage of love and life.

But if we don’t follow Jesus’ lessons, and wait until the last second, then we are foolish: We rush out and buy, not allowing time for the seeds to grow. We didn’t even plant any seeds, in the first place. We did nothing!

We can’t expect something to happen, if we refuse to do anything. Sure, the wolves might reject our love. So we don’t even try. But we don’t have to convert them, only comfort them. This requires no words, only our loving presence. In this way, we plant the seed, shine our light, allowing the love that’s larger than us, larger than life, to do the work needed to spread the Word.

“And I will betroth thee unto me for ever; yea, I will betroth thee unto me in righteousness, and in judgment, and in lovingkindness, and in mercies.”-Hosea 2:19.

Loving one another seems so very complicated, to the point of being impossible. And it is, until we spend time with it: forgiving each other and ourselves, showing mercy, being compassionate, not judging someone as ugly, but accepting their beauty as it is.

Think of loving kindness as insurance: Some day we will need it. If we can’t love each other, then we’re unable to love ourselves. We feel guilty, when abandoning others to their suffering. We might learn to live with that guilt, but when apocalyptic tribulation comes, we’ll having nothing to hold onto.

“Watch therefore, for ye know neither the day nor the hour wherein the Son of man cometh.”-Matthew 25:13.

This is what it boils down to: watching, always ready, because we’ve prepared ourselves. As we see how necessary it is to forgive ourselves, because we really had no idea what we were doing, we forgive others too.

Jesus lights our torch, invites us to dance and praise life. We accept his love, which seeds our hearts with humility and reverence. His only catch: that we share his seeds with others.

“…freely ye have received, freely give.”-Matthew 10:8.

We enlarge our hearts, leaving self behind, living for all, for God: aware at all times, mindful of suffering that we can comfort.

We give the seeds of mercy to those who are without, the light of compassion to those who live in darkness. We prepare for our foolishness, knowing it will come, that we’ll panic at the worst possible moment. And, in doing so, we stock our refrigerators for our guests, and respect our host by treating everyone the way we would have them treat us: the way God treats Jesus, who is inside all of us.

“At that day ye shall know that I am in my Father, and ye in me, and I in you.”-John 14:20.

Before our light goes out, before we despair, we forgive. Always forgive: This renews the torch, keeps us moving, breathing, playing, praying, dancing down the street, leading the marriage procession between love and life.

This is wisdom! It is the practiced instrument that becomes instinctive, second nature becoming first, every instance of love outnumbering the sands on all the shores of the world.

“And he brought [Abraham] forth abroad, and said, Look now toward heaven, and tell the stars, if thou be able to number them: and he said unto him, So shall thy seed be.”-Genesis 15:5.

We are and share Abraham’s seed, which is King David’s poetic soul, Solomon’s wisdom, the love, mercy, compassion, and patient forgiveness taught by their descendant, Jesus; handed down to us, so we can keep the fire burning, keep the immovable object moving: choosing mercy, refusing to let sin take root, reacting to the wolves (inside and out) with a strong mind, and a tender heart.

We know of the chain, cause and effect, and refuse to be its puppet. Jesus is my shepherd. I shall not want! The Lord breaks the chain of sin, shatters our bonds, leads us through the wilderness, all so that we can learn to love.

We waver, slip, run back to the pack, back to Egypt, wishing only for the safety of enslavement. But, in our thoughtless fear, if we practice enough ahead of time, our mindfulness returns. Our torches flair anew.

We remember Jesus: how his greatest triumph was dying on a cross, only to be born again. We realize the necessity of our suffering: so that we know how others feel, when they suffer.

Mercy ignites our torch; we shine with compassion, only to be extinguished by pride, reignited by forgiveness. Over and over! Unless we choose to learn from our mistakes, we are never free, always subject to the lash of regret.

“…If ye continue in my word, then are ye my disciples indeed; / And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.”-John 8:31, 32.

We cannot be free, until we know we’re slaves. We learn wisdom only after realizing how foolish we’ve been. The kingdom of heaven lives within, because the adversary lives within. Jesus gives us a torch, because darkness reigns otherwise.

“And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.”-Genesis 1:2.

Let there be light! Waver no more. Commit to the boundless wisdom you carry as a birthright, passed on to you through the covenant, the marriage between love and life. Don’t believe it, be it. The choice is yours: learn or don’t learn, wise or foolish, mindless wolves, or mindful lambs.

Just don’t take too long, because the door will shut: not forever, but for one person, one chance, which never comes again. We cannot step in the same river twice. Everything changes, grows, endures, and transforms. Cleanse yourself; be reborn, through love for one another: automatic forgiveness, instinctive mercy, and everlasting compassion. This is the way to the Promised Land.

“…As I was with Moses, so I will be with thee: I will not fail thee, nor forsake thee. // …Be strong and of good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee withersoever thou goest.”-Joshua 1:5, 9.

We won’t journey forever. The day will come when we cross the Jordan, pushing back the waters, following the Ark of the Covenant, and our leader, Joshua, our example, Jesus, the one and only Jehovah, which is all of us, and everything else.

This is wisdom. This is Jesus.

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(For the full essay, go here. If you missed Part One, go here.)

Don’t be too frustrated with yourself because of this. In the different kinds of soil that Jesus describes, the best of us live on stony ground. We hear and feel the Word, and love all things. But we are lambs among wolves.

Jesus warned us of this.

“And because iniquity shall abound, the love of many shall wax cold.”-Matthew 24:12.

We react based on how others treat us: cause and effect. This is natural. But the Bible (and Jesus’ lessons specifically) exist to warn us of our instinctive, but harmful behavior.

So if we sin because others sin against us, then, instead, we can choose to break the chain. We can forgive those who trespass against us, and thereby forgive and confront our own weaknesses. We can remove the stones from our ground, and out of our hearts, transforming temporary love (limited fuel) into perpetual motion, by choosing to accept and reflect the unending love of God, which is all around us.

“Behold, I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves: be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.”-Matthew 10:16.

When we carry extra oil, then we react to the wolves around us by being wise as serpents and harmless as doves: having a strong mind and tender heart.

If we let our minds weaken, or our hearts become like stone, then we add another link to the chain, and separate ourselves from the good fish, the nourishing wheat. This is foolishness.

God is everything. So love is everything, everywhere. In other words, we fuel our torches just by reaching out with mercy, compassion, and forgiveness.

This takes practice. Be patient with your patience.

Before we move on, note that Jesus is both the bridegroom and the light given by the lamps. More personally, mindfulness of mercy and compassion lights the torch. Our love for one another illuminates the way. And forgiveness renews the flame.

“While the bridegroom tarried, they all slumbered and slept.”-Matthew 25:5.

Everything takes time. Don’t panic! With patience, we learn humility; with humility, we learn reverence; and with reverence, we gain wisdom.

When the Jewish couple of Jesus’ time were to be married, the virgins kept the bride company, at the bride’s parents’ house. They waited for the groom, who could be held up for any number of reasons: working out the dowry, making arrangements at his parents’ house. No one knew when everything would be ready, when the groom would come for the bride.

The groom could arrive that night, the next night, or not for a couple of weeks. Nobody knew for sure. Part of the fun for the groom was to surprise the bridal party, even catch them napping.

“Wait on the LORD: be of good courage, and he shall strengthen thine heart: wait, I say, on the LORD.”-Psalm 27:14.

Going back as far as their Babylonian exile, the Hebrews were convinced that God had forsaken them.

“… for they say, The LORD hath forsaken the earth, and the LORD seeth not.”-Ezekiel 9:9.

In other words, the groom didn’t just tarry, he left us at the altar.

No matter how many times God proves that he will not abandon us, we surrender when things go wrong. This is natural. Even Jesus (quoting Psalm 22:1) felt this powerful, all-too-human emotion, when he was on the cross:

“…My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?”-Matthew 27:46.

If, at his most horrifying and painful moment, he thought God had forsaken him, then we can expect no better from ourselves. When in doubt, we go into fight or flight mode, and cut ourselves off from love. Even without choosing mindfully, we bear the responsibility of acting thoughtlessly. We wish for wolves to be lambs, and when they aren’t, we become wolves too.

Just because it’s natural doesn’t make it right. Just because it seems impossible, doesn’t mean we should refuse to try. Practice ahead of time, during the smaller tribulations. Don’t give up on love. Don’t panic. The groom needs time, because we need time to make ourselves ready. I know we tire, and fall asleep on watch (like Peter, James, and John in Gethsemane).

“Watch ye and pray, lest ye enter into temptation. The spirit truly is ready, but the flesh is weak.”-Mark 14:38.

Temptation should not be understood as we think of it today, as seducing for evil purposes. In the Bible, it translates as “a test.” The groom tests our reactions, to see if we are ready to be born again.

“…For the LORD your God is testing you, to know whether you love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul.”-Deuteronomy 13.3. (Taken from the English Standard Version.)

We can’t be physically, literally perfect. We make mistakes. Nor can we stay awake all the time. We must sleep. But we can be perfect in how we follow, and are tested by, Jesus’ lessons: not all at once, right off the bat, to be certain. But over time, with mindfulness, we can learn to see God everywhere, in everything.

We can stay awake in our hearts, minds, and souls.

We learn through temptation, by the tests God provides, like manna from heaven. If not for the apocalyptic results of our failed attempts, we would never learn how to be delivered from evil. These small temptations prepare us for the greater revelations, the more difficult tests.

Tribulation makes us ready.

“And at midnight there was a cry made, Behold, the bridegroom cometh; go ye out to meet him.”-Matthew 25:6.

When he finished all the arrangements, part of the Jewish marriage custom was for the groom to send a messenger. That way, the bride-to-be and the virgins received some advance warning.

For us, now, this means we get some warning prior to a test. It may not be much, a few seconds to prime our awareness, and be ready.

We never know when the opportunity will come for us to forgive, or show mercy and compassion. It often goes by so quickly, that we miss it altogether.

By showing mercy, we feel better: We lighten our burden. So when life tests us through other people, we not only help them, but ourselves too.

“Be ye ready also: for the Son of man cometh at an hour when ye think not.”-Luke 12:40.

We act wisely by keeping our torches lit, with forgiveness always in our hearts, acting with mercy and compassion. Remain aware of beauty and love, the connection of all things, which is God.

When we treat others kindly, they love us: cause and effect; maybe not all at once, so be patient. We love our family and friends because they love us. So if we forgive them, because they forgive us, let us share this with everyone.

“Judge not, and ye shall not be judged: condemn not, and ye shall not be condemned: forgive, and ye shall be forgiven.”-Luke 6:37.

With mindfulness, we break the old chain, in which we react foolishly to indifference and hostility; and begin a new chain. When we behave wisely, we no longer have to worry about fixing what our thoughtlessness ruined. We don’t have to worry at all: just be aware.

Everyone you meet needs you. And you need everyone you meet. But if we aren’t prepared, if we refuse to see love and beauty as the natural state of things, the state unadulterated by our judgmental perception, then we miss the chance to heal and prepare ourselves.

“Then all those virgins arose, and trimmed their lamps. / And the foolish said unto the wise, Give us of your oil; for our lamps are gone out.”-Matthew 25:7, 8.

You ever turn the key, and your car won’t start? Or flip the switch, and the light bulb dies? Or open the refrigerator, only to find it empty?

We must perform maintenance. We must learn algebra and trigonometry before we can understand calculus; walk, before we run. Our small tests prepare us. If we don’t learn from them, we are foolish.

Forgiveness maintains the flame of love. If we think that we can skip it, that someone doesn’t deserve our mercy and compassion, then our flame dies. We lose, by not loving others.

“John [the Baptist] answered and said, A man can receive nothing, except it be given him from heaven.”-John 3:27.

God tests us, knowing we won’t pass, because we aren’t mindful of love. We fail, so that we see our foolishness, and learn wisdom. We suffer the apocalypse, so that our humiliation teaches us humility, so that we choose to be born again, participating in the marriage between love and life.

I can’t tell you why it has to be that way. I don’t know why I have to learn the hard way. I only see what happens. And I see, in the occurrence, both my folly, and the seeds of wisdom. The why doesn’t matter so much as the how.

Jesus is wisdom: the how, the way out of this mess that we foolishly created, believing we could live without loving one another.

“But the wise [virgins] answered, saying, Not so; lest there be not enough [oil] for us and you: but go ye rather to them that sell, and buy for yourselves.”-Matthew 25:9.

When we see the refrigerator empty, then we know that we have to go to the grocery store. If we don’t check our food and drinks before our guests arrive, and, only then do we see we’re out, that is foolishness.

We laugh at the thought of being so unprepared, just as the Jews must have, when they heard Jesus tell this parable. The disrespect for our guests, our irresponsible actions as host, is inconceivable.

We might try to borrow from our neighbors. But it’s not their fault that we were unprepared. The blame lies with us. The virgins had one task: to be ready. Even though they fell asleep, and the messenger woke them at midnight, the wise ones had learned from past mistakes and heartbreaks. They were ready.

By not being honest with ourselves about our foolishness, yet believing that we’ve covered every base, we skip our tests. Then, when it comes time for our final exam, when the guests are due, we face the worst tragedy of all:

We’re too late.

(To be continued in Part Three.)

We choose how to react to our experiences. Whether thoughtlessly or mindfully, we bear the responsibility of adding another link to the chain, or breaking it to be born again.

“Then shall the kingdom of heaven be likened unto ten virgins, which took their lamps, and went forth to meet the bridegroom.”-Matthew 25:1.

Jesus shares this parable right in the middle of his discourse on the Second Coming, and the destruction of Jerusalem (which happened in 70 A.D., some 37 years after his crucifixion). That’s what he refers to, when he begins with “Then….”

So this parable applies to, and elucidates what Jesus said about “Judgment Day.” The kingdom of heaven results from the destruction of our world. Or, more personally, we are born again when we participate in the marriage between love and life.

Indeed, Revelation (the final book in the Bible) climaxes with the union between us and Jesus.

“Let us be glad and rejoice, and give honour to him: for the marriage of the Lamb is come, and his wife hath made herself ready.”-Revelation 19:7.

We make ourselves ready by acknowledging the folly of our pride, arrogance, and cruelty. When life tears us down, we learn and change from the experience. We either double-down on our foolishness, or gain wisdom: We choose our path based on how we react to apocalyptic experiences.

Jesus is the bridegroom.

“But the days will come, when the bridegroom shall be taken away from them, and then shall they fast in those days.”-Luke 5:35.

More personally, Jesus is our love for one another: the wisdom to understand that, without love, we are weak; without love, we fake strength, which causes sin. So when someone wrongs us (or we harm them), we know it’s because of their (or our) weakness.

We do not punish the weak, because then we would need to condemn ourselves as well.

“…He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her.”-John 8:7.

We are all mortal, and ignorant of what lies outside our experience. So mercy, compassion, and forgiveness should occur automatically. This requires us to be mindful, and practice love at all times. This is wisdom.

We’ve been working on “the kingdom of heaven” for several essays now. Basically, we are in the kingdom if we react wisely to Jesus’ lessons. The kingdom is our understanding of his lessons, and our commitment to live by them.

“…for, behold, the kingdom of God is within you.”-Luke 17:21.

So the kingdom is the love we feel and share. It is the potential within us, the realization of our better nature, our very heart, soul, mind, and strength.

“The ten virgins” represent all of us, the whole spectrum of humanity. Recall the first verse of a previous “kingdom” essay.

“Again the kingdom of heaven is like unto a net, that was cast into the sea, and gathered of every kind.”-Matthew 13:47.

From every kind, the angels separate the good fish from the bad, and the wheat from the tares. In the very next verse, as we’ve seen in previous essays, the virgins actually separate themselves, based on what they learned (or didn’t learn) from experience, how they react to their preparation for the marriage.

Our final term, in this first verse, is the “lamp” that each virgin carries. We’ll look deeper into this one as we go.

For now, let us note that all ten virgins, all of us, we all carry a lamp.

“And five of them were wise, and five were foolish.”-Matthew 25:2.

Right away, in this second verse, we see the point of the parable. Don’t misunderstand the terms. No one is all good, or all bad. Sometimes, we make foolish decisions, or we react wisely. Sometimes, we do the right thing; other times, the wrong thing.

We must be born again to see our variability, and mindful enough to commit to one or the other. Through our marriage with the Lamb, and our personal covenant with life, we dedicate ourselves to the pursuit of wisdom, and are, thereby, reborn. Like inertia, love struggles to begin, but continues easily, once we get moving.

If we react wisely to tribulation, the kingdom of heaven follows. Wisdom is understanding why we need love, mercy, compassion, and forgiveness: It was the lack of them that brought us to our day of reckoning.

Wisdom can be hard to define. Luckily, we have King Solomon. As the son and heir of King David (and Jesus’ ancestor), when the Lord appeared to him, and asked him what he wanted, this is what he said:

“Give therefore thy servant an understanding heart to judge thy people, that I may discern between good and bad….”-1 Kings 3:9.

If you could ask anything of God, and know that the Lord would grant your request, what would you ask for? Solomon had wisdom before God granted his wish for it. This is true of us all.

Jesus (our love within) takes what we offer (our talent), and multiplies our few loaves and fish, allowing us to feed thousands. If we use wisdom in being kind to others, we gain more.

“And God gave Solomon wisdom and understanding exceeding much, and largeness of heart, even as the sand that is on the sea shore.”-1 Kings 4:29.

For now, we note that wisdom is understanding, discerning honestly between good and bad. It is largeness of heart: such a great empathy that it could be likened to all the sand on the shores of every beach in the world.

With understanding, we don’t have to agree or approve. We just need to see and feel others so deeply, that we know why they did what they did. Leave yourself behind. When trying to understand someone, judge based on their thoughts and feelings, not yours.

If we practice this mindfully, it occurs automatically, and our understanding will be instinctive. This is wisdom.

“They that were foolish took their lamps, and took no oil with them. / But the wise took oil in their vessels with their lamps.”-Matthew 25:3, 4.

Jesus develops the parable quickly, defining and distinguishing wisdom and foolishness: We behave wisely when we prepare, and foolishly when we do not make ourselves ready.

“And this know, that if the goodman of the house had known what hour the thief would come, he would have watched, and not have suffered his house to be broken through.”-Luke 12:39.

We don’t know when disaster will strike, or when we’ll have the opportunity to forgive, show mercy and compassion. It’s like the musician’s nightmare: suddenly called onto stage, in front of a packed house, and given an instrument they don’t know how to play.

We can’t prepare for every eventuality. We’re unable to learn every instrument, and maintain familiarity with them at all times. But we can learn the basics of musicianship, and love.

“…Behold, the fear [reverence] of the Lord, that is wisdom; and to depart from evil is understanding.”-Job 28:28.

God is all things. So to revere the Lord is to admire and respect all things. That is the Bible’s main point. If we choose to love and respect everyone and everything, and do so mindfully at all times, that is wisdom. Or, rather, it’s the first step along the path. As Solomon wrote:

“The fear [reverence] of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge: but fools despise wisdom and instruction.”-Proverbs 1:7.

The translations for the last two quotes are a little misleading. By fear, what they meant to write (as we’d use the word today) is reverence. Don’t be afraid of sharing love, or rejoicing in life. Love God with all your heart, mind, soul, and strength. This is reverence.

The “lamps” that the virgins carried were actually torches.

Around the top of the torch, they wrapped rags soaked in oil; with enough in reserve, the torch lasted for several hours. The foolish virgins lit their torches, but failed to carry any extra oil with them. So their light wouldn’t last for long.

“Then spake Jesus again unto them, saying, I am the light of the world: he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life.”-John 8:12.

Jesus said he was many things, but the most common and often-repeated metaphor was light. Throughout the millennia, many religious and spiritual practices understood light as synonymous with nirvana, enlightenment, and being reborn.

So the lamps (or torches) produce light, which is Jesus, who is love. The oil maintains light. So love perseveres via the display of light, and the reapplication of rags soaked in oil.

Like inertia, our sharing of love makes it easier for us to continue sharing it. But if we don’t choose to shine our light on others, if, instead, we allow their cold hearts to influence our reactions, then love becomes almost impossible.

Remember the Parable of the Sower:

“But he that received the seed into stony places, the same is he that heareth the word, and anon with joy receiveth it; / Yet hath he not root in himself, but dureth for a while: for when tribulation or persecution ariseth because of the word, by and by he is offended.”-Matthew 13:20, 21.

In other words, when Jesus lights our torch, at first we feel love, if we are ready to receive it. But when someone else does something hateful and spiteful, they offend the foolish virgins; and, with no extra oil (without forgiveness), tribulation extinguishes love.

(To be continued in Part Two.)

(This one is a little long, about 19 pages. I recommend more bite-sized chunks: Part One, Part Two, and Part Three. You can always reach these again by going to the Intro/Contents link at the top of the page, and clicking on the title of this essay in the contents.)

We choose how to react to our experiences. Whether thoughtlessly or mindfully, we bear the responsibility of adding another link to the chain, or breaking it to be born again.

“Then shall the kingdom of heaven be likened unto ten virgins, which took their lamps, and went forth to meet the bridegroom.”-Matthew 25:1.

Jesus shares this parable right in the middle of his discourse on the Second Coming, and the destruction of Jerusalem (which happened in 70 A.D., some 37 years after his crucifixion). That’s what he refers to, when he begins with “Then….”

So this parable applies to, and elucidates what Jesus said about “Judgment Day.” The kingdom of heaven results from the destruction of our world. Or, more personally, we are born again when we participate in the marriage between love and life.

Indeed, Revelation (the final book in the Bible) climaxes with the union between us and Jesus.

“Let us be glad and rejoice, and give honour to him: for the marriage of the Lamb is come, and his wife hath made herself ready.”-Revelation 19:7.

We make ourselves ready by acknowledging the folly of our pride, arrogance, and cruelty. When life tears us down, we learn and change from the experience. We either double-down on our foolishness, or gain wisdom: We choose our path based on how we react to apocalyptic experiences.

Jesus is the bridegroom.

“But the days will come, when the bridegroom shall be taken away from them, and then shall they fast in those days.”-Luke 5:35.

More personally, Jesus is our love for one another: the wisdom to understand that, without love, we are weak; without love, we fake strength, which causes sin. So when someone wrongs us (or we harm them), we know it’s because of their (or our) weakness.

We do not punish the weak, because then we would need to condemn ourselves as well.

“…He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her.”-John 8:7.

We are all mortal, and ignorant of what lies outside our experience. So mercy, compassion, and forgiveness should occur automatically. This requires us to be mindful, and practice love at all times. This is wisdom.

We’ve been working on “the kingdom of heaven” for several essays now. Basically, we are in the kingdom if we react wisely to Jesus’ lessons. The kingdom is our understanding of his lessons, and our commitment to live by them.

“…for, behold, the kingdom of God is within you.”-Luke 17:21.

So the kingdom is the love we feel and share. It is the potential within us, the realization of our better nature, our very heart, soul, mind, and strength.

“The ten virgins” represent all of us, the whole spectrum of humanity. Recall the first verse of a previous “kingdom” essay.

“Again the kingdom of heaven is like unto a net, that was cast into the sea, and gathered of every kind.”-Matthew 13:47.

From every kind, the angels separate the good fish from the bad, and the wheat from the tares. In the very next verse, as we’ve seen in previous essays, the virgins actually separate themselves, based on what they learned (or didn’t learn) from experience, how they react to their preparation for the marriage.

Our final term, in this first verse, is the “lamp” that each virgin carries. We’ll look deeper into this one as we go.

For now, let us note that all ten virgins, all of us, we all carry a lamp.

“And five of them were wise, and five were foolish.”-Matthew 25:2.

Right away, in this second verse, we see the point of the parable. Don’t misunderstand the terms. No one is all good, or all bad. Sometimes, we make foolish decisions, or we react wisely. Sometimes, we do the right thing; other times, the wrong thing.

We must be born again to see our variability, and mindful enough to commit to one or the other. Through our marriage with the Lamb, and our personal covenant with life, we dedicate ourselves to the pursuit of wisdom, and are, thereby, reborn. Like inertia, love struggles to begin, but continues easily, once we get moving.

If we react wisely to tribulation, the kingdom of heaven follows. Wisdom is understanding why we need love, mercy, compassion, and forgiveness: It was the lack of them that brought us to our day of reckoning.

Wisdom can be hard to define. Luckily, we have King Solomon. As the son and heir of King David (and Jesus’ ancestor), when the Lord appeared to him, and asked him what he wanted, this is what he said:

“Give therefore thy servant an understanding heart to judge thy people, that I may discern between good and bad….”-1 Kings 3:9.

If you could ask anything of God, and know that the Lord would grant your request, what would you ask for? Solomon had wisdom before God granted his wish for it. This is true of us all.

Jesus (our love within) takes what we offer (our talent), and multiplies our few loaves and fish, allowing us to feed thousands. If we use wisdom in being kind to others, we gain more.

“And God gave Solomon wisdom and understanding exceeding much, and largeness of heart, even as the sand that is on the sea shore.”-1 Kings 4:29.

For now, we note that wisdom is understanding, discerning honestly between good and bad. It is largeness of heart: such a great empathy that it could be likened to all the sand on the shores of every beach in the world.

With understanding, we don’t have to agree or approve. We just need to see and feel others so deeply, that we know why they did what they did. Leave yourself behind. When trying to understand someone, judge based on their thoughts and feelings, not yours.

If we practice this mindfully, it occurs automatically, and our understanding will be instinctive. This is wisdom.

“They that were foolish took their lamps, and took no oil with them. / But the wise took oil in their vessels with their lamps.”-Matthew 25:3, 4.

Jesus develops the parable quickly, defining and distinguishing wisdom and foolishness: We behave wisely when we prepare, and foolishly when we do not make ourselves ready.

“And this know, that if the goodman of the house had known what hour the thief would come, he would have watched, and not have suffered his house to be broken through.”-Luke 12:39.

We don’t know when disaster will strike, or when we’ll have the opportunity to forgive, show mercy and compassion. It’s like the musician’s nightmare: suddenly called onto stage, in front of a packed house, and given an instrument they don’t know how to play.

We can’t prepare for every eventuality. We’re unable to learn every instrument, and maintain familiarity with them at all times. But we can learn the basics of musicianship, and love.

“…Behold, the fear [reverence] of the Lord, that is wisdom; and to depart from evil is understanding.”-Job 28:28.

God is all things. So to revere the Lord is to admire and respect all things. That is the Bible’s main point. If we choose to love and respect everyone and everything, and do so mindfully at all times, that is wisdom. Or, rather, it’s the first step along the path. As Solomon wrote:

“The fear [reverence] of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge: but fools despise wisdom and instruction.”-Proverbs 1:7.

The translations for the last two quotes are a little misleading. By fear, what they meant to write (as we’d use the word today) is reverence. Don’t be afraid of sharing love, or rejoicing in life. Love God with all your heart, mind, soul, and strength. This is reverence.

The “lamps” that the virgins carried were actually torches.

Around the top of the torch, they wrapped rags soaked in oil; with enough in reserve, the torch lasted for several hours. The foolish virgins lit their torches, but failed to carry any extra oil with them. So their light wouldn’t last for long.

“Then spake Jesus again unto them, saying, I am the light of the world: he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life.”-John 8:12.

Jesus said he was many things, but the most common and often-repeated metaphor was light. Throughout the millennia, many religious and spiritual practices understood light as synonymous with nirvana, enlightenment, and being reborn.

So the lamps (or torches) produce light, which is Jesus, who is love. The oil maintains light. So love perseveres via the display of light, and the reapplication of rags soaked in oil.

Like inertia, our sharing of love makes it easier for us to continue sharing it. But if we don’t choose to shine our light on others, if, instead, we allow their cold hearts to influence our reactions, then love becomes almost impossible.

Remember the Parable of the Sower:

“But he that received the seed into stony places, the same is he that heareth the word, and anon with joy receiveth it; / Yet hath he not root in himself, but dureth for a while: for when tribulation or persecution ariseth because of the word, by and by he is offended.”-Matthew 13:20, 21.

In other words, when Jesus lights our torch, at first we feel love, if we are ready to receive it. But when someone else does something hateful and spiteful, they offend the foolish virgins; and, with no extra oil (without forgiveness), tribulation extinguishes love.

Don’t be too frustrated with yourself because of this. In the different kinds of soil that Jesus describes, the best of us live on stony ground. We hear and feel the Word, and love all things. But we are lambs among wolves.

Jesus warned us of this.

“And because iniquity shall abound, the love of many shall wax cold.”-Matthew 24:12.

We react based on how others treat us: cause and effect. This is natural. But the Bible (and Jesus’ lessons specifically) exist to warn us of our instinctive, but harmful behavior.

So if we sin because others sin against us, then, instead, we can choose to break the chain. We can forgive those who trespass against us, and thereby forgive and confront our own weaknesses. We can remove the stones from our ground, and out of our hearts, transforming temporary love (limited fuel) into perpetual motion, by choosing to accept and reflect the unending love of God, which is all around us.

“Behold, I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves: be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.”-Matthew 10:16.

When we carry extra oil, then we react to the wolves around us by being wise as serpents and harmless as doves: having a strong mind and tender heart.

If we let our minds weaken, or our hearts become like stone, then we add another link to the chain, and separate ourselves from the good fish, the nourishing wheat. This is foolishness.

God is everything. So love is everything, everywhere. In other words, we fuel our torches just by reaching out with mercy, compassion, and forgiveness.

This takes practice. Be patient with your patience.

Before we move on, note that Jesus is both the bridegroom and the light given by the lamps. More personally, mindfulness of mercy and compassion lights the torch. Our love for one another illuminates the way. And forgiveness renews the flame.

“While the bridegroom tarried, they all slumbered and slept.”-Matthew 25:5.

Everything takes time. Don’t panic! With patience, we learn humility; with humility, we learn reverence; and with reverence, we gain wisdom.

When the Jewish couple of Jesus’ time were to be married, the virgins kept the bride company, at the bride’s parents’ house. They waited for the groom, who could be held up for any number of reasons: working out the dowry, making arrangements at his parents’ house. No one knew when everything would be ready, when the groom would come for the bride.

The groom could arrive that night, the next night, or not for a couple of weeks. Nobody knew for sure. Part of the fun for the groom was to surprise the bridal party, even catch them napping.

“Wait on the LORD: be of good courage, and he shall strengthen thine heart: wait, I say, on the LORD.”-Psalm 27:14.

Going back as far as their Babylonian exile, the Hebrews were convinced that God had forsaken them.

“… for they say, The LORD hath forsaken the earth, and the LORD seeth not.”-Ezekiel 9:9.

In other words, the groom didn’t just tarry, he left us at the altar.

No matter how many times God proves that he will not abandon us, we surrender when things go wrong. This is natural. Even Jesus (quoting Psalm 22:1) felt this powerful, all-too-human emotion, when he was on the cross:

“…My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?”-Matthew 27:46.

If, at his most horrifying and painful moment, he thought God had forsaken him, then we can expect no better from ourselves. When in doubt, we go into fight or flight mode, and cut ourselves off from love. Even without choosing mindfully, we bear the responsibility of acting thoughtlessly. We wish for wolves to be lambs, and when they aren’t, we become wolves too.

Just because it’s natural doesn’t make it right. Just because it seems impossible, doesn’t mean we should refuse to try. Practice ahead of time, during the smaller tribulations. Don’t give up on love. Don’t panic. The groom needs time, because we need time to make ourselves ready. I know we tire, and fall asleep on watch (like Peter, James, and John in Gethsemane).

“Watch ye and pray, lest ye enter into temptation. The spirit truly is ready, but the flesh is weak.”-Mark 14:38.

Temptation should not be understood as we think of it today, as seducing for evil purposes. In the Bible, it translates as “a test.” The groom tests our reactions, to see if we are ready to be born again.

“…For the LORD your God is testing you, to know whether you love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul.”-Deuteronomy 13.3. (Taken from the English Standard Version.)

We can’t be physically, literally perfect. We make mistakes. Nor can we stay awake all the time. We must sleep. But we can be perfect in how we follow, and are tested by, Jesus’ lessons: not all at once, right off the bat, to be certain. But over time, with mindfulness, we can learn to see God everywhere, in everything.

We can stay awake in our hearts, minds, and souls.

We learn through temptation, by the tests God provides, like manna from heaven. If not for the apocalyptic results of our failed attempts, we would never learn how to be delivered from evil. These small temptations prepare us for the greater revelations, the more difficult tests.

Tribulation makes us ready.

“And at midnight there was a cry made, Behold, the bridegroom cometh; go ye out to meet him.”-Matthew 25:6.

When he finished all the arrangements, part of the Jewish marriage custom was for the groom to send a messenger. That way, the bride-to-be and the virgins received some advance warning.

For us, now, this means we get some warning prior to a test. It may not be much, a few seconds to prime our awareness, and be ready.

We never know when the opportunity will come for us to forgive, or show mercy and compassion. It often goes by so quickly, that we miss it altogether.

By showing mercy, we feel better: We lighten our burden. So when life tests us through other people, we not only help them, but ourselves too.

“Be ye ready also: for the Son of man cometh at an hour when ye think not.”-Luke 12:40.

We act wisely by keeping our torches lit, with forgiveness always in our hearts, acting with mercy and compassion. Remain aware of beauty and love, the connection of all things, which is God.

When we treat others kindly, they love us: cause and effect; maybe not all at once, so be patient. We love our family and friends because they love us. So if we forgive them, because they forgive us, let us share this with everyone.

“Judge not, and ye shall not be judged: condemn not, and ye shall not be condemned: forgive, and ye shall be forgiven.”-Luke 6:37.

With mindfulness, we break the old chain, in which we react foolishly to indifference and hostility; and begin a new chain. When we behave wisely, we no longer have to worry about fixing what our thoughtlessness ruined. We don’t have to worry at all: just be aware.

Everyone you meet needs you. And you need everyone you meet. But if we aren’t prepared, if we refuse to see love and beauty as the natural state of things, the state unadulterated by our judgmental perception, then we miss the chance to heal and prepare ourselves.

“Then all those virgins arose, and trimmed their lamps. / And the foolish said unto the wise, Give us of your oil; for our lamps are gone out.”-Matthew 25:7, 8.

You ever turn the key, and your car won’t start? Or flip the switch, and the light bulb dies? Or open the refrigerator, only to find it empty?

We must perform maintenance. We must learn algebra and trigonometry before we can understand calculus; walk, before we run. Our small tests prepare us. If we don’t learn from them, we are foolish.

Forgiveness maintains the flame of love. If we think that we can skip it, that someone doesn’t deserve our mercy and compassion, then our flame dies. We lose, by not loving others.

“John [the Baptist] answered and said, A man can receive nothing, except it be given him from heaven.”-John 3:27.

God tests us, knowing we won’t pass, because we aren’t mindful of love. We fail, so that we see our foolishness, and learn wisdom. We suffer the apocalypse, so that our humiliation teaches us humility, so that we choose to be born again, participating in the marriage between love and life.

I can’t tell you why it has to be that way. I don’t know why I have to learn the hard way. I only see what happens. And I see, in the occurrence, both my folly, and the seeds of wisdom. The why doesn’t matter so much as the how.

Jesus is wisdom: the how, the way out of this mess that we foolishly created, believing we could live without loving one another.

“But the wise [virgins] answered, saying, Not so; lest there be not enough [oil] for us and you: but go ye rather to them that sell, and buy for yourselves.”-Matthew 25:9.

When we see the refrigerator empty, then we know that we have to go to the grocery store. If we don’t check our food and drinks before our guests arrive, and, only then do we see we’re out, that is foolishness.

We laugh at the thought of being so unprepared, just as the Jews must have, when they heard Jesus tell this parable. The disrespect for our guests, our irresponsible actions as host, is inconceivable.

We might try to borrow from our neighbors. But it’s not their fault that we were unprepared. The blame lies with us. The virgins had one task: to be ready. Even though they fell asleep, and the messenger woke them at midnight, the wise ones had learned from past mistakes and heartbreaks. They were ready.

By not being honest with ourselves about our foolishness, yet believing that we’ve covered every base, we skip our tests. Then, when it comes time for our final exam, when the guests are due, we face the worst tragedy of all:

We’re too late.

“And while they went to buy, the bridegroom came; and they that were ready went in with him to the marriage: and the door was shut.”-Matthew 25:10.

In Jewish custom, the Rabbi performed the marriage ceremony at the bride’s parents’ house. Once the groom arrived, they shut the door. If you weren’t ready, you missed the ceremony. Afterwards, with their torches lit, the virgins danced down the street, leading the marriage procession to the groom’s parents’ house.

Unlike us, the Jewish couple in ancient times didn’t go away on a honeymoon. Instead, at the groom’s parents’ house, they held a week-long celebration. Anyone could come. The doors remained open. People came and went, whether they were wise or foolish, and participated in the most glorious party, celebrating the marriage between love and life.

We are reborn, and begin the path to wisdom by being mindful of what we and others need: Do they need to be forgiven? Forgive them. Do they need compassion? Be compassionate unto them. By practicing in this way, we learn to respect and admire everyone and everything. We practice love until we feel it, without having to stop and think.

We understand that no one is always wise. So we forgive them when they’re foolish. We realize that no one is always a fool, so we admire them when they show wisdom. As we watch them, we’re aware of ourselves wavering: good, bad, wise, foolish.

Being born again means that we choose to become aware of this vacillation, in ourselves and others. And we commit ourselves to wisdom. Then, we become lambs.

Part of wisdom is knowing that, just as we needed time to prepare, other people haven’t learned from experience; they haven’t dedicated themselves to a better life. They are wolves.

Don’t expect a wolf to be a lamb. And, as a lamb, be wary of slipping back into the pack, howling with them as they hunt their neighbors. Just know, more than likely (actually, without a doubt), you will slip. So have patience with them, as you do with yourself; forgive them, and yourself. Have mercy, because the time will come when, during such a slip, you will need mercy.

The door shuts, regardless of whether you’re inside or out.

“Afterward came also the other [foolish] virgins, saying, Lord, Lord, open to us.”-Matthew 25:11.

Keep in mind, when Jesus told this parable, he was aware that his Jewish audience knew the custom; they knew of the week-long party, which anyone could attend. But they also knew, if you were outside the shut door, you would miss the ceremony.

There is always another test. But there’s also a potential for finality. In the flesh, I will never get to tell my Grandfather that he was right, that everything I searched for was in the Bible. That door closed. But I can pass it on. I cannot pay him back, but I can pay it forward. That’s what these essays are: What I would say to him, if I could, if I had been ready to enter the door, and attend the ceremony with him.

But I was a small fish (and still am). So the fishermen threw me back. I was a tare, so the farmers separated me from the wheat. Without that heartbreaking, and illuminating experience, I would not be on this journey today. And these essays would not exist.

“Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven.”-Matthew 7:21.

God’s will for the world is whatever happens. The Lord’s will for us is that we love whatever happens. Even, or especially, if we don’t understand, or approve, or agree, we love because Jesus loves us, because God loves the world, all life, everything: good, evil, wise, foolish, the caterpillar under the log in the middle of the jungle, the murderer on death row: God has enough love for all of it, all of us. That’s why we’re here. This is wisdom.

But if we choose to not love, if we’re unable to understand the necessity for automatic forgiveness, then Jesus shuts the door. We cannot enter, what we’re unwilling to enter. We cannot pass the line we’ve drawn. So we judge and condemn ourselves.

“But he answered [the foolish virgins] and said, Verily I say unto you, I know you not.”-Matthew 25:12.

By failing to prepare, we disrespect the groom, his bride, the other guests, and ourselves. If you remember, from Revelation, the bride is everyone. Plus, the 10 virgins represent everyone. And Jesus is the groom.

So, by failing to prepare, we haven’t shown reverence to God, which is everyone and everything. Solomon taught that reverence to all is the beginning of wisdom. Without wisdom, we are foolish.

When Jesus says he doesn’t know us, it’s because we don’t know love. Wisdom is the understanding that comes from sharing love. Without that awareness, we cannot be born again, and enter the kingdom of heaven.

“Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me.”-Revelation 3:20.

It might seem to us that Jesus is keeping us out, when, really, we deny him entrance. He didn’t leave us at the altar; we left him. God didn’t abandon the earth; we abandoned him. See the pattern?

Saying “Lord, Lord” means nothing, if we refuse to forgive, and show mercy and compassion.

“And why call ye me Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say?”-Luke 6:46.

Like the Sower, when we love others, we plant a seed, which needs time to grow. During that time we learn patience: We wait on the Lord. And we learn wisdom: We watch God’s will work itself out, through the apocalypse, and into the marriage of love and life.

But if we don’t follow Jesus’ lessons, and wait until the last second, then we are foolish: We rush out and buy, not allowing time for the seeds to grow. We didn’t even plant any seeds, in the first place. We did nothing!

We can’t expect something to happen, if we refuse to do anything. Sure, the wolves might reject our love. So we don’t even try. But we don’t have to convert them, only comfort them. This requires no words, only our loving presence. In this way, we plant the seed, shine our light, allowing the love that’s larger than us, larger than life, to do the work needed to spread the Word.

“And I will betroth thee unto me for ever; yea, I will betroth thee unto me in righteousness, and in judgment, and in lovingkindness, and in mercies.”-Hosea 2:19.

Loving one another seems so very complicated, to the point of being impossible. And it is, until we spend time with it: forgiving each other and ourselves, showing mercy, being compassionate, not judging someone as ugly, but accepting their beauty as it is.

Think of loving kindness as insurance: Some day we will need it. If we can’t love each other, then we’re unable to love ourselves. We feel guilty, when abandoning others to their suffering. We might learn to live with that guilt, but when apocalyptic tribulation comes, we’ll having nothing to hold onto.

“Watch therefore, for ye know neither the day nor the hour wherein the Son of man cometh.”-Matthew 25:13.

This is what it boils down to: watching, always ready, because we’ve prepared ourselves. As we see how necessary it is to forgive ourselves, because we really had no idea what we were doing, we forgive others too.

Jesus lights our torch, invites us to dance and praise life. We accept his love, which seeds our hearts with humility and reverence. His only catch: that we share his seeds with others.

“…freely ye have received, freely give.”-Matthew 10:8.

We enlarge our hearts, leaving self behind, living for all, for God: aware at all times, mindful of suffering that we can comfort.

We give the seeds of mercy to those who are without, the light of compassion to those who live in darkness. We prepare for our foolishness, knowing it will come, that we’ll panic at the worst possible moment. And, in doing so, we stock our refrigerators for our guests, and respect our host by treating everyone the way we would have them treat us: the way God treats Jesus, who is inside all of us.

“At that day ye shall know that I am in my Father, and ye in me, and I in you.”-John 14:20.

Before our light goes out, before we despair, we forgive. Always forgive: This renews the torch, keeps us moving, breathing, playing, praying, dancing down the street, leading the marriage procession between love and life.

This is wisdom! It is the practiced instrument that becomes instinctive, second nature becoming first, every instance of love outnumbering the sands on all the shores of the world.

“And he brought [Abraham] forth abroad, and said, Look now toward heaven, and tell the stars, if thou be able to number them: and he said unto him, So shall thy seed be.”-Genesis 15:5.

We are and share Abraham’s seed, which is King David’s poetic soul, Solomon’s wisdom, the love, mercy, compassion, and patient forgiveness taught by their descendant, Jesus; handed down to us, so we can keep the fire burning, keep the immovable object moving: choosing mercy, refusing to let sin take root, reacting to the wolves (inside and out) with a strong mind, and a tender heart.

We know of the chain, cause and effect, and refuse to be its puppet. Jesus is my shepherd. I shall not want! The Lord breaks the chain of sin, shatters our bonds, leads us through the wilderness, all so that we can learn to love.

We waver, slip, run back to the pack, back to Egypt, wishing only for the safety of enslavement. But, in our thoughtless fear, if we practice enough ahead of time, our mindfulness returns. Our torches flair anew.

We remember Jesus: how his greatest triumph was dying on a cross, only to be born again. We realize the necessity of our suffering: so that we know how others feel, when they suffer.

Mercy ignites our torch; we shine with compassion, only to be extinguished by pride, reignited by forgiveness. Over and over! Unless we choose to learn from our mistakes, we are never free, always subject to the lash of regret.

“…If ye continue in my word, then are ye my disciples indeed; / And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.”-John 8:31, 32.

We cannot be free, until we know we’re slaves. We learn wisdom only after realizing how foolish we’ve been. The kingdom of heaven lives within, because the adversary lives within. Jesus gives us a torch, because darkness reigns otherwise.

“And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.”-Genesis 1:2.

Let there be light! Waver no more. Commit to the boundless wisdom you carry as a birthright, passed on to you through the covenant, the marriage between love and life. Don’t believe it, be it. The choice is yours: learn or don’t learn, wise or foolish, mindless wolves, or mindful lambs.

Just don’t take too long, because the door will shut: not forever, but for one person, one chance, which never comes again. We cannot step in the same river twice. Everything changes, grows, endures, and transforms. Cleanse yourself; be reborn, through love for one another: automatic forgiveness, instinctive mercy, and everlasting compassion. This is the way to the Promised Land.

“…As I was with Moses, so I will be with thee: I will not fail thee, nor forsake thee. // …Be strong and of good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee withersoever thou goest.”-Joshua 1:5, 9.

We won’t journey forever. The day will come when we cross the Jordan, pushing back the waters, following the Ark of the Covenant, and our leader, Joshua, our example, Jesus, the one and only Jehovah, which is all of us, and everything else.

This is wisdom. This is Jesus.